Dublin Essentials:

How big is Dublin?
The Irish capital is about 45 square miles in size. It is divided into the north and the south sides by the River Liffey. Getting around the city centre on foot is easy, and you can walk from O’Connell Street which is the main street on the north side, to Grafton Street, the south side’s main thoroughfare in around ten minutes.
How many people inhabit it?
Anything between 1 million and 1½ million people occupy Dublin, although a staggering 50% of those are under the age of 30.
What are the language and currency?
Dubliners, or Dubs as they are locally known, speak English and spend Euro.
  • Irish Museum of Modern Art Dublin
Irish Museum of Modern Art Dublin Temple Bar Dublin Gates of Kilmainham Dublin St Stephens Green Trinity College Dublin Handprints outside The Gaiety Theatre Kilmainham Dublin Irish Museum of Modern Art Kilmainham Dublin Sculpture Kilmainham Art at Kilmainham Wall of Fame Dublin National Museum of decorative arts Dublin Luas Dublin Dublin Bikes Viking Splash Tour Dublin Phoenix Park Dublin Luas outside Heuston Station Dublin Obelisk Phoenix Park Dublin Flowers in Phoenix Park Dublin Heuston Station Dublin Gaiety Handprints Dublin Kilmainham Art Irish Museum of Modern Art Christchurch Dublin Map of St Stephens Green Inside St Stephens Green Dublin St Stephens Green Shopping Centre Grafton Street Dublin Bewleys on Grafton Street The Douglas Hyde Gallery The Book of Kells Dublin Sculpture in Trinity College National Gallery Ireland Merrion Square Park Micheal Collins Sculpture Merrion Square Park flowers Oscar Wilde sculpture Merrion Square Park More art work in Merrion Square Park Garden of Rememberence Dublin Children of Lir Sculpture

Things to see in Dublin

Trinity College
What is Dublin's number one attraction?
The Guinness Storehouse (why do I get the feeling you’re not surprised to discover Ireland’s number one attraction revolves around drink?) is Dublin’s number one attraction. Housed inside a building which was once a central part of the brewing process, it was transformed into the world-class attraction it is today. Spaced out over 7 floors, the top floor is ‘Gravity’, a bar boasting very impressive views over the city. It costs €14, but this includes a pint of the ‘black stuff’. Not to be missed.
Anything else which shouldn’t be missed?
The National Gallery on Merrion Square and the National Museum of Archaeology and History on Kildare Street are two of the city’s finest museums. Both have free admission. Dublinia/Christ Church Cathedral is also well worth a visit.
On average, how much does it cost to get into Dublin’s top museums?
Zilch. That’s right – they’re all free. Well all the national ones are (those owned by the state). As are all the national galleries. Privately-owned museums such as the Dublin Writers Museum cost around €5-€6 to get in.
Where can you find Dublin’s finest architecture?
Dublin doesn’t have one particular area where all its finest buildings stand tall. Instead they can be found in different locations around the city. Many of these were built by one James Gandon, such as the Customs House and the Four Courts, the high court of Ireland?
Anything else I need to know?
If you want to get out of the city for the day, buy an all-day DART (Dublin Area Rapid Transport) ticket for €6.50 which gives you unlimited travel on Dublin’s DART (city rail) service. At the south end of the line is Dun Laoighre which has one of the most beautiful piers/harbours in the country. On the northern end of the line is Malahide, another coastal town with a great selection of bars and restaurants.

Going out in Dublin

The Temple Bar Pub, Temple Bar
Is it expensive to go out in Dublin?
I’m afraid so. Dublin is notoriously expensive, although in the wake of the smoking ban more and more pubs are slashing their prices to lure thirsty punters back through their doors. The average pint will cost you between €4 and €5.
Where are most of the bars found?
Temple Bar is where bars outweigh any other type of establishment. Most are of the ‘diddly-ei’ variety complete with Irish music and ‘Irish stew’ on the menu. You won’t find any Dubliners in any of these bars mind you. They’ll be found packing Dublin’s trendiest bars which are on Georges Street, South William Street or Camden Street.
Do I need to carry my ID with me when going out?
If you look anything like Macauly Culkin did in the first Home Alone movie, then carrying ID mightn’t be the worst idea in the world. Otherwise you probably won’t need it. Also, don’t worry about wearing runners as the days of being refused on the basis of your choice of footwear are (in most cases) long gone.
Is there anything to do that doesn’t involve alcohol?
Drinking isn’t the only pastime Dubliners engage in after dark. They are big theatre buffs and are one of the biggest cinema-goers in Europe. A ticket to the theatre will set you back anything between €10 and €25 at one of the city centre’s many theatres. If you want to catch a movie it will set you back around €5 before 6pm and €8.50 after.
Any particular bars /clubs worth singling out?
That all depends on what sort of night you want. In Temple Bar, the Oliver St John Gogarty is where you will find loads of traditional Irish music so it attracts a lot of tourists. There are a lot of bars not far from here on South William Street, such as Dakota and Spy, although these aren’t extremely authentically Irish. If you want something more traditional, but not something geared towards tourists, visit either Keoghs (South Anne Street) or McDaids (Harry Street). Both are off the top of Grafton Street.
Anything else I need to know?
Ireland famously became the first country outside the US to ban smoking in bars, so if you want to smoke remember don’t light up indoors!

Eating Out in Dublin

Temple Bar
Is it expensive to eat out in Dublin?
It can be. Mains cost more than €10 in most restaurants, although those few that have dishes for under €10 are surprisingly good quality. When your budget can’t stretch to a meal in a restaurant you can always bank on the many fast food restaurants around the city for a feed.
Where is the best selection of restaurants in the city?
Temple Bar just south of the River Liffey has the highest concentration of restaurants in the city. It also has the highest concentration of tourists so you won’t find too many bargains. Georges Street on the other hand has many good-value restaurants, and around Chatham Street off Grafton Street are a handful of Italian restaurants where €10 will go a long way.
Are international cuisines well-represented?
Oh yes. Every month a new Indonesian or Vietnamese eatery opens to join the hundreds of Thai and Indians already existing.
What times do restaurants close?
Many restaurants stay open until midnight, but in most cases if you wish to eat out you will need to be sitting down and ordering by 10.30pm at the latest.
Anything else I need to know?
If you plan to eat out, try and do so before 7.30pm where you can choose from the ‘early-bird’ menus. For around €15 you’ll get a two course, or in some cases three-course meal. And if you try.

Transport in Dublin

A Dublin bus
How many different modes of public transport are there in Dublin?
Four – bus, DART (train), Luas (tram), and taxi.
Is there one ticket which covers bus, DART and Luas services?
No. You can buy bus/DART tickets, bus/Luas tickets, but no ticket covers all three.
Will I need to use public transport at all?
Probably not. Dublin is flat, and it’s very easy to get around on foot. You can get from the middle of O’Connell Street (the epicentre of the northside city centre) to the middle of Grafton Street (the southside’s focal point) in about ten minutes.

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  • Dublin Travel Video
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Make your trip go further with Hostels.com. We offer the most comprehensive selection of hostels on the internet with over 35,000 hostels in 180 countries. Bringing you great value and providing a service that is fuss free, reliable and frankly brilliant! Hostels.com the ultimate resource for great value accommodation all over the world.

  • Dublin Podcast
  • Dublin - The National Wax Museum Plus
  • Dublin - The National Wax Museum Plus

  • City: Dublin
  • Lisa Jameson from Dublin's National Wax Museum Plus talks to Tracy Lynch about the history of this top Dublin attraction.
  • Dublin Podcast
  • Dublin - The Hugh Lane Gallery
  • Dublin - The Hugh Lane Gallery

  • City: Dublin
  • Katy Fitzpatrick and Logan Sisley of the Hugh Lane Gallery in Dublin talk to Tracy Lynch about the history of this popular art gallery and what you will find on a visit there.
  • Dublin Podcast
  • Dublin - Local Tips
  • Dublin - Local Tips

  • City: Dublin
  • Tracy Lynch takes to the streets of Dublin to ask the locals what their favourite free things to do in Dublin are.

Make your trip go further with Hostels.com. We offer the most comprehensive selection of hostels on the internet with over 35,000 hostels in 180 countries. Bringing you great value and providing a service that is fuss free, reliable and frankly brilliant! Hostels.com the ultimate resource for great value accommodation all over the world.

  • Posted: Tuesday, February 18, 2014
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  • What to expect if you’re in Dublin for St Patrick’s Day 2014

  • Category: Events & Holidays
  • What to expect if you’re in Dublin for St Patrick’s Day 2014
  • There’s so much going on to celebrate St Patrick’s Day that in recent years it’s been expanded into a festival across four days. From the 14th to 17th March, Dublin city centre will be busy, busy, busy with live music, street performances, markets and more. If it’s your first time experiencing St Patrick’s Day in Dublin, you will probably be wondering what to expect once you’re there. No worries – we’ve got you sorted.
  • Posted: Thursday, March 7, 2013
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  • Posted: Tuesday, February 12, 2013
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  • Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013
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  • Cheap eats in Dublin

  • Category: Cheap eats
  • Cheap eats in Dublin
  • Over the last few years Dublin has seen so many restaurants, cafes, pop-ups and delis open their doors all around the city. From Thai to Mongolian, Argentinean to American, and many local specialities, too, the choices are endless.
  • Posted: Monday, August 27, 2012
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  • Posted: Tuesday, June 7, 2011
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